Guest Post: 6 Questions (and Answers!) about Editing Contracts You’ll Want to Know

Editor’s note: For more information on what to include in an editing contract, see Megan’s “8 Must-Haves for Freelance Editing Contracts.”

By Megan Harris

If your book is complete, or in the process of being completed, you may start to think about the next steps involving your book–namely, hiring an editor to help you polish your work. Before you send your manuscript off to the cutting room floor, however, it’s important to provide parameters for your project and sign a contract.

Here are some of the most common questions writers who have never hired an editor ask, and some answers to help you along the way! Continue reading

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Legal Considerations for Authors

By Sachinwarankar (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Sachinwarankar (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

For writers and publishers, there are a lot of interesting things to consider when it comes to the law.

For writers looking to go the traditionally published route, there’s a lot to keep in mind contract-wise, including, according to Kristine Kathryn Rusch, control, fairness, and clout. She explains that you want as much control over your project as possible, though some contracts may not allow for negotiation, so you’ll have to ask yourself if that contract is something you really want. Also, things will not always be fair, but you don’t need clout to negotiate, you just need to get past the idea that you need a certain level of success before you can negotiate and just go for it. The worst thing that can happen is the person you’re negotiating with can say “no.” Continue reading