From Grammarly: Valentine’s Day and Online Dating

Grammarly always has fun holiday infographics. For Valentine’s Day, they’ve teamed up with eHarmony to see how people’s writing, based on their dating profiles, affected their chances of getting a date.

Grammarly reviewed 10,000 eHarmony male/female matches generated by eHarmony’s matching algorithm. Fifty percent of the matches advanced to two-way communication, while the other 50 percent failed to advance. Each male and female in a match wrote long-form answers to questions on their dating profile. These writing samples were analyzed by Grammarly’s automated proofreader for accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Valentine's Day Grammar 2016 Infographic

About Grammarly

Grammarly is a simple and powerful writing app that corrects more types of spelling and grammatical mistakes than any other software on the market. The product suite comprises the Grammarly Editor online editing tool; browser extensions for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari; Grammarly for Microsoft Office; and the Grammarly native app, a convenient desktop editor for Mac and PC.

As a company, Grammarly’s mission is to improve communication among the world’s more than 2 billion native and non-native English writers. Millions of registered users worldwide trust Grammarly’s products, which are also licensed by more than 600 leading universities and corporations. Grammarly is an Inc. 500 company with offices in San Francisco and Kyiv.

About eHarmony

eHarmony, Inc. was founded in 2000 and is a pioneer in using relationship science to match singles seeking long-term relationships. Its service presents users with compatible matches based on key dimensions of personality that are scientifically proven to predict highly successful long-term relationships.

Additional Sources

Independent.co.uk

Wired.com

Mashable.com

Match.com

PlentyofFish

How About We

Advertisements

Guest Post: Proofreading Style and Grammar with Document Grader

DocuGrader

By Patrick Roberts

Patrick Roberts is the creator of Document Grader, a tool designed to grade writing on a deeper level than the average grammar checking program. Authors can easily use the tool to help with their work.

Document Grader goes beyond finding superficial grammar or spelling mistakes, as most grammar checking tools already do.  Instead, the service highlights a wide range of language/usage issues that might affect the readability of your writing, including phrases that might be too wordy, colloquial, passive or cliched. When you click on these contextual highlights you will see an explanation of the issue along with some useful examples of what to do and what not to do.  In many cases, you can fix the issues in your writing with a single click.

Patrick created the following video to show what Document Grader looks like in action:

Patrick Roberts is a self-employed IT professional who is interested in internet based tools for writers. Along these lines, he recently released Document Grader (www.docgrader.com) to help authors of all shapes and sizes improve their writing habits.

Indie Authors: Self-Editing Before Getting Your Manuscript Edited

By Phoebe (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Phoebe (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Editing is an important step to publishing, both indie and traditional. A book that is poorly edited can be a big turn off to readers. Bridget McKenna gives an example in her post, “Why I Didn’t Keep Reading Your Book, Part 2“:

Your opening sentence demonstrated that you don’t know the difference between “number,” which is used to describe things that can be counted, such as fenceposts and birds, and “amount,” which is used to describe something functionally impossible to count, like water or sand. So “a large amount of birds” flapping around the very first line of your book didn’t fill me with a sense of promise for your writing or a lot of respect for your editor. I’ll never know whether you told a good story—what I found in the few pages convinced me you couldn’t write well enough for the quality of the story to make a difference to me.

Steamfeed has a list of grammar mistakes to watch out for, so as to keep your readers happy. Examples include it’s v. its, affect and effect, and quotation marks. Continue reading

So You Want to Write a Novel: Five Writing Mistakes, According to Grammarly

Grammarly, a platform that helps writers edit, has taken NaNoWriMo to a new level the past two years with its novel writing group @Grammowrimo. Last November, Grammarly worked with 500 writers to produce a 40,000 word novel. In addition to publishing a novel, they’ve compiled a list of the top five common writing mistakes. See their infographic below for tips on how to improve your own writing: Continue reading