Taking Stock of Industries Related to Book Publishing and How That Relates to the Future

media

Book publishers can learn a lot from their media counterparts. As the world becomes more connected, the lines between these industries is getting blurred. Keeping on top of trends then can be really helpful, in terms of getting ideas of what can be done and what to expect in the future. Here are a few headlines from other forms of media that can help inform people in book publishing:

Music

Movies, TV, Video

Comics

Games

Education

News, Blogs

Ads

Content

Design

Monetization

Startups, Niche

All this connectedness, combined with lower barriers to entry, have made it easier than ever for people to start their own startups. Not all are successful, but they are all interesting.

Apps

Books

Book Publishers

Book Publishing

Book Recommendations

Lessons

Niche

Tech

Future, Trends

After taking a look at other industries, as well as new companies in the book industry, it’s interesting to read about trends and predictions for the future.

Authors

Design

Marketing

News

Predictions

Research

Ebooks

Last, it’s fun to see all the pieces starting to come together in the form of ebooks. There’s a lot of interesting developments in the EPUB world.

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Indie Authors: Marketing Books With Videos

With digital media, indie authors can now take advantage of videos to help grab the attention of readers and sell their books.

I’ve been thinking about this topic for a while, and there’s a lot to consider. Videos can be used in multiple ways, such as teaser trailers, snippets of scenes, author interviews, and even chats with big groups. They can be simple or complex, free or monetized. Continue reading

More on Penguin

NYU published its blog post about our recent trip to Penguin’s Media Suite. I posted an example of what they do in “Penguin’s Video Lab” and you can also see me in the last picture in NYU’s post (I’m the one in blue). Enjoy!

NYU Pub Posts

Podcasts. Audiobooks. Videos. Apps. Digital media has fast become an integral part of book marketing strategies, and it keeps growing in importance. So what’s a leading publisher to do? Last week students in the M.S. in Publishing: Digital and Print Media program at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies learned how Penguin Group (USA), Inc. solved the problem: they created their own media suite!

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Penguin’s Video Lab

Today I had the opportunity to tour Penguin’s video lab through NYU. Above is an example of some of the work they do.

Having a full studio in-house saves Penguin a lot of money and allows them to do satellite author tours, book trailers, and work on enhanced ebooks. It also allows them to make videos for both big hits and less major book campaigns.

 

Fun(ny) Copyright Cases

Learning about publishing law may be a lot of work, but it sure is entertaining. In my last class, we discussed a couple of particularly interesting cases, one of which involves the video you see above.

South Park is no stranger to lawsuits. But their most recent one concerns copyright infringement upon a hit YouTube video from 2007. In 2008, South Park released an episode entitled, “Canada on Strike,” which featured a recreation of Samwell’s hit video. South Park called their video, “What, What, in the Butt.”

Obviously, South Park is claiming parody under fair use as a defense. This is, after all, what South Park is all about. But did they copy excessively? Is this a case of copyright infringement? What do you think?

The next case involves the (now dead) magazine, Cooks Source. In their October issue, the magazine used word-for-word an article written by Monica Gaudio–without her permission–on their Facebook page, online magazine, and print issue. When Monica wrote the magazine editor, asking for an apology and a small donation to Columbia’s School of Journalism, this was the response she got:

“Yes Monica, I have been doing this for 3 decades, having been an editor at The Voice, Housitonic Home and Connecticut Woman Magazine. I do know about copyright laws. It was “my bad” indeed, and, as the magazine is put together in long sessions, tired eyes and minds somethings forget to do these things.
But honestly Monica, the web is considered “public domain” and you should be happy we just didn’t “lift” your whole article and put someone else’s name on it! It happens a lot, clearly more than you are aware of, especially on college campuses, and the workplace. If you took offence and are unhappy, I am sorry, but you as a professional should know that the article we used written by you was in very bad need of editing, and is much better now than was originally. Now it will work well for your portfolio. For that reason, I have a bit of a difficult time with your requests for monetary gain, albeit for such a fine (and very wealthy!) institution. We put some time into rewrites, you should compensate me! I never charge young writers for advice or rewriting poorly written pieces, and have many who write for me… ALWAYS for free!”

Two weeks later, the magazine closed. My whole class laughed at this one–obviously there is something wrong when the magazine editor thinks that just because something is published on the Internet, it’s public domain. There are literally tons of cases that prove her wrong. Epic fail.

Here’s the full story on Gawker: Magazine Editor Steals Article, Tells Writer ‘You Should Compensate Me!’

Douglas Adams: Parrots, the Universe and Everything

Don’t panic. It’s just a video.

I love everything Douglas Adams, so I was thrilled when my friend sent me the link to TED of Adams giving a talk at UC Santa Barbara (my alma mater!) And then, as I do with everything I’m interested in, I did some research. I knew that Adams had died somewhere in the early 2000s, before the newest Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy movie came out (oh, Marvin!) and I wanted to know where his trip to Santa Barbara fit into that time frame.

So, like any good researcher, I went straight to Wikipedia, and I found out that he had died in May of 2001, the same month he had given that talk at UCSB! And then I read a little further, and it turns out he had died in Santa Barbara, shortly after giving that talk. He’d had a heart attack while working out at the gym; he was only 49 years old.

Nooooo! Douglas Adams, why? If only I were a few years older, maybe I could have seen you…

Anyway, if you get a chance, you should check out my friend’s blog, “Pizza Please.” She’s currently living in Bologna, Italy, and who wouldn’t want to know more about that country?